Birthday Cake Ice Cream

Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog

My best friend and I recently had a disagreement about whether cake and ice cream were best or worst served together. I said I always dreaded cake and ice cream time at birthday parties when I was growing up because I hated having them on the same plate but was too shy to ask to have them one at a time. Something about cold, soggy cake and crumb-filled ice cream eaten with a fork just filled me with a sorrow I have yet to recover from. He said all of those things were amazing and the best part of childhood. We absolutely could not find common ground on the topic. With his birthday coming up this weekend, I decided to make him something special: birthday cake ice cream with the cake crumbs stirred right in.

Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog

Ingredients

  • 1 box of rainbow chip cake mix
    • (+ 1 cup water)
    • (+ ½ cup vegetable oil)
    • (+ 2 eggs)
  • 1½ cups whole milk
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 tbsp vanilla paste or extract
  • 1 handful of rainbow sprinkles

Method

  1. Prepare and bake the rainbow chip cake in a 13×9 pan, according to package instructions.
  2. Meanwhile, bring the whole milk, sugar and salt to a simmer over medium-low heat. Stir until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Beat the egg yolks lightly in a bowl.
  4. Temper the eggs by slowly stirring a ½ cup of the warm milk mixture into them, beating constantly, then stirring this egg mixture into the milk mixture.
  5. Cook over low heat, stirring often, until this mixture starts to thicken and reaches a temperature of 175°F. You’ve made custard!
  6. Strain into a small, heat-safe bowl to catch any lumps of egg yolk that didn’t temper properly and chill in the fridge until cold.
  7. Once cold, stir in the heavy cream and vanilla and churn in an ice cream maker.
  8. While the ice cream is churning, crumble half of the cake into bite-sized chunks.
  9. Place the cake crumbs and fully churned ice cream into a large storage container with half of the sprinkles and fold everything together. Sprinkle remaining sprinkles on top, lightly press a sheet of cling wrap down onto the surface of the ice cream, place the lid on the container and freeze overnight.

Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog Homemade Birthday Cake Ice Cream | Sophster-Toaster Blog

All photos by me.

Froot Loops Macarons

Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

With their crispy-on-the-outside, chewy-on-the-inside texture and sweet, subtly fruity, cereal and milk flavour, these pale cookies with pastel flecks are just perfect for spring!

Ingredients

for the macarons

  • 1 cup ground almonds (as finely ground as you can find)
  • 1½ cups icing sugar
  • 1/3 cup crushed Froot Loops cereal
  • 3 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp high quality vanilla extract

for the buttercream

  • 7 tbsp unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 egg, at room temperature
  • 3 tbsp water
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • ¼ to ½ cup crushed Froot Loops cereal, depending on how smooth or chunky you want your buttercream to be

Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

Method

for the macarons

  1. Prepare your parchment sheets by drawing 1″ circles, ½” apart across the entire sheet (or using silicon baking mats with the circles already printed on them) and placing them on a large flat surface suitable for drying your batter, like a dining table. You will need 2-3 half sheet pan size pieces.
  2. Sift ground almonds and icing sugar, together, twice. Add crushed Froot Loops. Set aside.
  3. In a large stainless steel mixing bowl, beat egg whites with a hand or stand mixer on high speed until you have a foam with no liquid remaining.
  4. Slowly add the sugar while continuing to beat the egg whites. Beat on high speed until the egg whites reach stiff peaks. You’ve made meringue!
  5. Add vanilla and beat in.
  6. Fold your almond and icing sugar mixture into the meringue in two parts.
  7. Here’s the part that takes practice: it’s time for the macaronnage. With a spatula, spread the batter, with some force, against the side of the bowl. Then scoop it up by running the spatula along the side of the bowl again and try to flip it all over and sort-of lightly smack it back into the bottom of the bowl. Gather the batter up again and repeat 15-20 times. It takes some time to figure out the best way to do this, don’t be afraid to play around with it. When doing the macaronnage correctly, repeating more than 20 times can result in oily, blotchy macarons, but I’ve found that doing it incorrectly doesn’t count towards this limit. If you are doing it right, the batter will take on a noticeable and somewhat sudden change in consistency, this means you are about half-way to that limit. When finished, the batter should be thickened and drip slowly from the spatula. You will have to pipe it onto your baking sheets/mats and it won’t work if the batter is too runny. This is the technique that defines macarons, this is what makes mastery of them impressive.
  8. For perfectly round macarons, use a large, 0.4″ plain tip with a pastry bag, or do it the lazy way and cut a corner off a zip top bag for mostly round macarons. Twist (or don’t yet cut) the bag at the tip and place it, tip side down, in a tall glass. Fill with your batter and twist, close or clip the other end to help keep the messy batter moving in the right direction. Pipe the batter into the centre of the circles on your sheets/mats and stop before reaching the edges as the batter will spread out a bit.
  9. Once finished piping, carefully pick the sheets/mats up and drop them back on to the table from a high of a couple of inches. The theory is that this helps the cookies keep their round shape and form the little bubbles (the pied) when you put them in the oven.
  10. Leave the cookies on the table, uncovered, for 15-30 minutes to dry. This is a good time to preheat your oven to 350°F. You will know the macarons are dry when they look smooth and are no longer sticky to the touch.
  11. Place an oven rack in the centre of your oven. Place a sheet of macarons on two doubled up sheet pans (this will stop the bottoms from getting too hot, resulting in cracked macarons) and bake for about 15 minutes. Rotate the pan half way through baking. At this point, if you want to try to keep your cookies light in colour, place a second oven rack directly below the first and move your cookies down to it, then place a third sheet pan above the cookies on the higher rack to protect them from the heat above. It can be hard to tell when the macaron are done. I pull them out when the kitchen smells sweet and the cookies look crisp, have just started to brown and don’t look splotchy in the middle.
  12. As soon as the parchment sheet/baking mat is cool enough to handle, take it out of the pan with all the cookies on top and place it on a cooling rack. The macarons will be too sticky to remove from the sheet/mat now; once cooled, they should peel off easily. I usually wait a few minutes for the pans to cool a bit and for the oven to come back to a steady temperature before moving the next sheet to the pans and baking the next round.

for the buttercream

  1. Make sure the butter is soft enough for you to press your finger into. On a cold, winter day, this may mean cutting it into pieces and warming it up slightly in the microwave or oven, still warm from your macarons. Cream the butter in a medium sized bowl. Set aside.
  2. Break the egg into a large heat-resistant mixing bowl and beat lightly with a hand mixer. Set aside.
  3. Add water and sugar to a small saucepan and place over medium-low heat. Bring to a simmer and stir until thick and syrupy, about 7 minutes. You’ve made simple syrup!
  4. Slowly pour your simple syrup into the beaten egg while beating with a hand mixer on as high a speed as you can without flinging syrup everywhere, remember it is hot and sticky. Once all the syrup is in, beat the mixture on high speed, slowly reducing speed until it is white, thick, and the bowl is no longer hot.
  5. Add the butter to this mixture in two or three parts and beat on medium speed until fully incorporated and creamy. If you are like me, the buttercream will split now. If continuing to beat doesn’t bring it back together, it has likely become too cold. Pop it in the still-warm oven for 30 seconds and try beating it again. Continue doing this until it comes together.
  6. Add the crushed Froot Loops and beat lightly until mixed in.
  7. Now pipe the buttercream between two cookies and enjoy your hard work!

Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog  Froot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster BlogFroot Loops Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

All photos by me.

Whiskey Cream Macarons

Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

I think I’ve finally cracked the code on these tricky little cookies. These Kelly green macarons with Irish whiskey buttercream filling are some of the best I’ve ever made. Here’s the recipe I’ve developed that seems to work best for the type of ground almonds and eggs available near me, the humidity of where I live, and my conventional gas oven.

Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

Ingredients

for the macarons

  • 1 cup ground almonds (as finely ground as you can find)
  • 1½ cups icing sugar
  • 3 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp high quality vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp Kelly green gel food colouring

for the buttercream

  • 7 tbsp unsalted butter, softened
  • 3 tbsp water
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 1 egg, at room temperature
  • 2 tbsp good Irish whiskey (The buttercream won’t taste like whiskey, but rather like the tasting notes of the whiskey, so a better whiskey will produce a better, richer, more interesting flavour in the buttercream.)

Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

Method

for the macarons

  1. Prepare your parchment sheets by drawing 1″ circles, ½” apart across the entire sheet (or using silicon baking mats with the circles already printed on them) and placing them on a large flat surface suitable for drying your batter, like a dining table. You will need 2-3 half sheet pan size pieces.
  2. Sift ground almonds and icing sugar, together, twice. Set aside.
  3. In a large stainless steel mixing bowl, beat egg whites with a hand or stand mixer on high speed until you have a foam with no liquid remaining.
  4. Slowly add the sugar while continuing to beat the egg whites. Beat on high speed until the egg whites reach stiff peaks. You’ve made meringue!
  5. Add vanilla and gel colouring and beat in until colour is fully incorporated.
  6. Fold your almond and icing sugar mixture into the meringue in two parts.
  7. Here’s the part that takes practice: it’s time for the macaronnage. With a spatula, spread the batter, with some force, against the side of the bowl. Then scoop it up by running the spatula along the side of the bowl again and try to flip it all over and sort-of lightly smack it back into the bottom of the bowl. Gather the batter up again and repeat 15-20 times. It takes some time to figure out the best way to do this, don’t be afraid to play around with it. When doing the macaronnage correctly, repeating more than 20 times can result in oily, blotchy macarons, but I’ve found that doing it incorrectly doesn’t count towards this limit. If you are doing it right, the batter will take on a noticeable and somewhat sudden change in consistency, this means you are about half-way to that limit. When finished, the batter should be thickened and drip slowly from the spatula. You will have to pipe it onto your baking sheets/mats and it won’t work if the batter is too runny. This is the technique that defines macarons, this is what makes mastery of them impressive.
  8. For perfectly round macarons, use a large, 0.4″ plain tip with a pastry bag, or do it the lazy way and cut a corner off a zip top bag for mostly round macarons. Twist (or don’t yet cut) the bag at the tip and place it, tip side down, in a tall glass. Fill with your batter and twist, close or clip the other end to help keep the messy batter moving in the right direction. Pipe the batter into the centre of the circles on your sheets/mats and stop before reaching the edges as the batter will spread out a bit.
  9. Once finished piping, carefully pick the sheets/mats up and drop them back on to the table from a high of a couple of inches. The theory is that this helps the cookies keep their round shape and form the little bubbles (the pied) when you put them in the oven.
  10. Leave the cookies on the table, uncovered, for 15-30 minutes to dry. This is a good time to preheat your oven to 350°F. You will know the macarons are dry when they look smooth and are no longer sticky to the touch.
  11. Place an oven rack in the centre of your oven. Place a sheet of macarons on two doubled up sheet pans (this will stop the bottoms from getting too hot, resulting in cracked macarons) and bake for about 15 minutes. Rotate the pan half way through baking. It can be hard to tell when the macaron are done. I pull them out when the kitchen smells sweet and the cookies look crisp and have just started to brown ever-so-slightly.
  12. As soon as the parchment sheet/baking mat is cool enough to handle, take it out of the pan with all the cookies on top and place it on a cooling rack. The macarons will be too sticky to remove from the sheet/mat now; once cooled, they should peel off easily. I usually wait a few minutes for the pans to cool a bit and for the oven to come back to a steady temperature before moving the next sheet to the pans and baking the next round.

for the buttercream

  1. Make sure the butter is soft enough for you to press your finger into. On a cold, winter day, this may mean cutting it into pieces and warming it up slightly in the microwave or oven – still warm from your macarons. Cream the butter in a medium sized bowl. Set aside.
  2. Break the egg into a large heat-resistant mixing bowl and beat lightly with a hand mixer. Set aside.
  3. Add water and sugar to a small saucepan and place over medium-low heat. Bring to a simmer and stir until thick and syrupy, about 7 minutes. You’ve made simple syrup!
  4. Slowly pour your simple syrup into the beaten egg while beating with a hand mixer on as high a speed as you can without flinging syrup everywhere, remember it is hot and sticky. Once all the syrup is in, beat the mixture on high speed, slowly reducing speed until it is white, thick, and the bowl is no longer hot.
  5. Add the butter to this mixture in two or three parts and beat on medium speed until fully incorporated and creamy. If you are like me, the buttercream will split now. If continuing to beat doesn’t bring it back together, it has likely become too cold. Pop it in the warm oven for 30 seconds and try beating it again. Continue doing this until it comes together.
  6. Add the whiskey and beat until mixed in.
  7. Now pipe the buttercream between two cookies and enjoy your hard work!

Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog Whiskey Cream Macarons | Sophster-Toaster Blog

All photos by me.

Chocolate Cherry White Russian

Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog

It recently came up, over dinner, that my friends had never seen The Big Lebowski. With this wrong needing to be righted as quickly as possible, we made plans to watch it together the following weekend. Of course, my husband and I informed them that White Russians were required viewing accessories. They were apprehensive about a cream based cocktail but agreed to let me push them out of their comfort zones.

There was a problem with the plan, however: I couldn’t put my money where my mouth was because I have a moderate-to-severe coffee allergy and can’t drink Kahlua. Slightly disappointed that I’ll never know what a real White Russian tastes like, I spent the past week developing a new cocktail, inspired by the classic, so I could join in with the fun.

After some research, I decided the closest swap for coffee liqueur would be chocolate liqueur. I was hoping to find a dark coloured chocolate liqueur to best mimic the look of a Kahlua cocktail, but discovered the only thing available in my area is a clear creme de cacao – so that’s what I used. I didn’t want to be creating what would be, essentially, hard chocolate milk, so I added some kirsch to make things a little more interesting.  The result is a decadent, surprisingly smooth and refreshing cocktail that’s just perfect for Valentine’s Day!

Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog

Chocolate Cherry White Russian

Ingredients

  • 1 oz vodka
  • ½ oz Kirsch (or other cherry brandy)
  • 1 oz creme de cacao
  • 1½ oz half & half cream

Method

  1. Add all ingredients to a shaker with ice and stir until chilled and thoroughly combined.
  2. Fill an old fashioned glass with a handful of fresh ice and strain mixture over. Serve immediately.

Chocolate Cherry White Russian | Sophster-Toaster Blog

All photos be me.